HISTORY OF WHITTLESFORD

WHITTLESFORD

The village of Whittlesford stands by the river Cam or Granta, 7 miles south of Cambridge. The parish, roughly rectangular in shape and 1,976 a. in extent, is bounded on the south by the Royston Newmarket road, formerly a branch of the Icknield Way, and on part of the west by a brook rising at a place called Nine Wells. The eastern boundary follows various branches and former channels of the river.

The northern boundary with Little Shelford was undefined until inclosure, the land being partly intercommonable. The parish lies mostly between 50 and 125 ft. above sea level, and has little sharp relief. The subsoil is mostly chalk, with alluvium along the river, but there is a gravel rise near Stanmoor Hall in the north-west quarter of the parish, and south of the village, where gravel lies over the chalk, the ground also swells gently to over 100 ft. The level northern part of the parish is drained by small streams and water-courses mostly leading north-east into the river.

From: 'Parishes: Whittlesford', A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 6 (1978), pp. 263-276.

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http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66728

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